Last edited by Nelar
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of social histories of smallpox and tuberculosis in Canada (culture, evolution and disease) found in the catalog.

social histories of smallpox and tuberculosis in Canada (culture, evolution and disease)

E. L. M. Thorpe

social histories of smallpox and tuberculosis in Canada (culture, evolution and disease)

by E. L. M. Thorpe

  • 61 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by University of Manitoba, Dept. of Anthropology in Winnipeg, Man .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Indians of North America -- Canada -- Health and hygiene,
  • Medical anthropology -- Canada,
  • Smallpox -- Canada,
  • Tuberculosis -- Canada,
  • Indians of North America -- Diseases -- Canada

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby E.L.M. Thorpe.
    SeriesUniversity of Manitoba anthropology papers -- no. 30
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE78C2 T47 1989
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 129 p.
    Number of Pages129
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14764833M

    2 days ago  It was abandoning our nomadic lifestyle and then domesticating animals, says Bregman, that brought about infectious diseases such as measles, smallpox, tuberculosis, syphilis, malaria, cholera . The most destructive disease brought by Europeans was smallpox. The first well-documented smallpox epidemic happened in The Lakota Indians called the disease the running face sickness. Smallpox was lethal to many Native Americans, bringing sweeping epidemics and affecting the .

    The iconic Hudson's Bay point blanket has a complicated history with Indigenous people in Canada. These blankets first appeared in Canadian trading posts in the s, and aside from bedding, they.   Smallpox was finally controlled by the development of the world's first vaccine in the late s, but fears linger that a few cells remaining in Petri dishes could be used as biological weaponry Author: Heather Whipps.

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine efficacy is estimated to be about 51% in preventing any TB disease and up to 78% in protecting newborns from miliary (disseminated) or meningeal TB. Intradermal administration of BCG vaccine usually results in erythema and a papule or ulceration, followed by a scar at the immunization site. Ethnohistorical sources document smallpox's effect on Native American morale, health, social structure, and population size. Some researchers argue that the way Native Americans viewed the disease, as well as their methods of disease treatment and response to .


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Social histories of smallpox and tuberculosis in Canada (culture, evolution and disease) by E. L. M. Thorpe Download PDF EPUB FB2

The social histories of smallpox and tuberculosis in Canada: culture, evolution, and disease. [Ethel L M Thorpe] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help.

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Author(s): Thorpe,Ethel L M Title(s): The social histories of smallpox and tuberculosis in Canada: culture, evolution, and disease/ by E.L.M. Thorpe. This book examines how smallpox changed population dynamics from early contact between native people and Europeans in Canada in the 17th century through the end of the 19th century.

Daschuk looks at how new mechanisms of hunting, as well as the trade in beaver fur and bison hide, spread disease amongst native people. The rash blisters and scabs, leaving pitted scars or “pocks.” Smallpox can cause pneumonia, blindness, and infection in joints and bones.

There is also a less virulent form of smallpox called alastrim, caused by the variola minor virus. Smallpox spreads in saliva droplets and.

"Today we have no conception of the meaning of the word 'smallpox'." So wrote Dr. John Heagerty of Canada’s Federal Public Health Service in the booklet, Small-Pox and Vaccination: A Popular Treatise, published in the wake of a deadly smallpox epidemic that struck the Windsor, Ontario area in Of the 67 cases reported, 32 died and the death rate among the unvaccinated was a striking 71%.

Moore follows the history of the disease from its first recorded appearance in Asia and Africa to Arabia and finally to Europe and America. he then provides a history of treatment, including three chapters on the discovery and reception of inoculation. Moore was an early advocate of vaccination, and this book is dedicated to Edward Jenner.

In Moore was appointed director of the National 5/5(1). In Hopkins's history, smallpox was one of the most dangerous—and influential—factors that shaped the course of world by: In Canada it is usually caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

TB is contracted through contact with someone who has infectious (active) tuberculosis. People with infectious TB release TB organisms into the air when they cough. Anyone who inhales the organisms could develop the disease.

Smallpox has been identified as a possible agent of bioterrorism. It seems prudent to review the history of a disease known to few people in the 21st century. Edward Jenner (Figure (Figure1 1) is well known around the world for his innovative contribution to immunization and the ultimate eradication of smallpox.

Jenner's work is widely. Books shelved as smallpox: The Demon in the Freezer by Richard Preston, The Speckled Monster: A Historical Tale of Battling Smallpox by Jennifer Lee Carr. Eradication of smallpox is considered the biggest achievement in international public health. Stocks of Variola Virus.

Following the eradication of smallpox, scientists and public health officials determined there was still a need to perform research using the variola virus. They agreed to reduce the number of laboratories holding stocks of variola virus to only four locations.

Malaria, tuberculosis, leprosy, influenza, smallpox and others first appeared during this period. Source Book of Medical History, Logan Clendening, published by. CDC recommends discontinuation of routine immunization and vaccination requirements for smallpox in the United States.; Investigations into lead exposure associated with an ore smelter in El Paso, Texas, increases the scientific understanding of the effects of lead poisoning in children, as it can affect children’s developing nerves and brains.

Consumption, phthisis and the White Plague are all terms used to refer to tuberculosis throughout is generally accepted that Mycobacterium tuberculosis originated from other, more primitive organisms of the same genusresults of a new DNA study of a tuberculosis genome reconstructed from remains in southern Peru suggest that human tuberculosis is less than.

Epidemic tuberculosis (TB) came to Canada with European settlers in the s. Aboriginal people in southeast Canada were probably first exposed to TB over years ago, while those on the west coast were exposed about years ago.

TB was spread to First Nations and Métis on the Prairies about years ago when the Canadian Pacific Railway. When Europeans first arrived in the New World during the late 15th and early 16th centuries, they used advanced military techniques to conquer North and South America with haste.

But they also brought smallpox, which played an instrumental role in killing Native Americans. Europeans from the Old World had a long history of living in close quarters with domesticated animals as well as eating.

The sole documented instance of smallpox in the blankets was approved by an Englishman and instigated by a brace of Swiss mercenaries. White American settlers and soldiers had murdered large groups of Indians, including women and children, from the 17 th century to the end of the 19th century with guns, poison and clubs—but they didn’t use.

Smallpox was an infectious disease caused by one of two virus variants, Variola major and Variola minor. The last naturally occurring case was diagnosed in Octoberand the World Health Organization (WHO) certified the global eradication of the disease in The risk of death following contracting the disease was about 30%, with higher rates among ms: Early: Fever, vomiting, mouth sores, Later:.

New France, Canada: – – St. Lawrence Valley smallpox epidemic Smallpox: 18,+ (36% of population) Iceland: – Great smallpox epidemic Smallpox:Denmark, Sweden, Lithuania: – Great Northern War plague outbreak: Plague: Thirteen Colonies: – Measles: New France, Canada: – Measles Duration: Human history.

From the medieval period to the modern day, Helen Bynum explores the history and development of tuberculosis throughout the world, touching on the various discoveries that have emerged about the disease over time, and focussing on the experimental approaches of Jean-Antoine Villemin () and Robert Koch ().Cited by:.

The Indian epidemic was thought to be punishment from a god, and the survivors created a goddess, Sitala, as the anthropomorphic personification of the disease. Smallpox was thus regarded as possession by Sitala.

In Hinduism the goddess Sitala both causes and cures high fever, rashes, hot flashes and pustules. A “brilliant and sobering” (Paul Kennedy, Wall Street Journal) look at the history and human costs of pandemic outbreaks The World Economic Forum #1 book to read for context on the coronavirus outbreak This sweeping exploration of the impact of epidemic diseases looks at how mass infectious outbreaks have shaped society, from the Black Death to today.

In a clear and accessible. Smallpox, infectious disease that begins with fever and headache and proceeds to an eruption of the skin that leaves pockmarks.

For centuries smallpox was one of the world’s most-dreaded diseases. But it was also one of the first diseases to be controlled by a vaccine, which led to its eradication in